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Archive for the ‘sewing projects’ Category

the PINK silk apronSo you DON’T like to SEW!

Stitch WitcheryYou can still make this apron without a stitch—well, you will need     Stitch Witchery.

  Just 4 easy steps!

1— cut the sides open,

     & cut off the sleeves

2— shape the front

3— make ties

4— create your pockets!

*A quick TIP as you begin—iron your shirt—it’s so much easier cutting crisp, smooth fabric and your cut lines will be better too!


 

1st step-

Cut  UP  the side seams to the under arms to separate the front and back of the shirt.

I like to approach this in one of 2 ways

◊ I cut SUPER CLOSE to the manufactured seam.  Cutting from the “bottom” side of that manufactured seam—it becomes the “finished” edge and I’m done!

◊ Leave ¼” to ½” salvage from the manufactured seam to turn under.  The manufactured seam will still be the front-side finished edge.

shirt aprons -NO SEWING

Cutting off the sleeves.

 RESIST THE TEMPTATION to just lay your shirt down and cut it in this quick/random way—you’ll lose material you may need or want for other parts!   Be patient—cut up the sides, cut off the sleeves, then shape your “halter.”

shaping the front and cutting off the arms

◊ It doesn’t really matter which side of the seam you cut, but do stay close to it so you don’t lose extra material.

cutting off the sleeves-


 

2nd step-

Shape the front into a Halter.

*TIP- if you fold the front sides together your “halter” cuts will be “matching” —but it’s better to open it back up and cut freehand around the collar.  I tend to freehand all my cuts, but I drew a chalk line for you to see this better below.

◊ As you’re cutting, leave ¼” to ½” extra around the collar to turn under.

shaping the "HALTER"

Now that you have the main cuts made, you can start to turn under the raw edges to “hem.”

◊ Start from the lower sides, folding over-turning and ironing, working upward to the collar.

prepping to "hem" the raw edges

raw edges folded over and ironed

◊ Using the Stitch Witchery tape, you’ll essentially tuck the tape between (wrong side of fabric) the inside of the apron and the turned/ironed edge AND THEN IRON OVER IT TO MELT THE TAPE fusing the fabric with NO sewing!

Stitch Witchery tape is –glue– when it’s melted by the heat of an iron.  The product instructions say to use a dry iron, but having used this product in lots of ways over many years time, I’ve found—the tape melts easier and better with a steam iron!

*I keep a small roll in my luggage when I travel for any quick fixes!

*I’m told fabric glue would work well too—although I’ve never tried it.

◊ As you work your way around to the collar, you’ll see it has multiple layers and you’ll need to cut some away.  Then continue to iron the area together with the Stitch Witchery tape.

cut away any extra layers

fusing the "seams" together -

the apron--without sewing


 

3rd step-

Cutting the ties from the back of the shirt -it keeps a simple continuity to the apron.

◊ I typically cut off the yolk just to free up the part I am using, especially  when there’s a pleat at the yolk.

◊ Fold the back of the shirt in half.

cutting the ties-

Below, a couple examples for making your tie cuts.

    1. Use a measuring guide, or
    2. as you’re cutting–fold that cut upward creating a continuing accurate size guide as you cut.
    3. Or just freehand it like I do—it’s all part of that “bespoke” look!

◊ A 2″ wide tie works well for me, so I cut a 4″ wide piece from the folded over area.

◊ When you unfold the piece you have 2 sides—cut it in 2.

cutting the ties-

◊ Fold over and iron ¼” edge on each side, then fold the whole piece in half.  Put the Stitch Witchery between the two sides and iron till the tape is melted.

creating the ties-

creating the ties-

◊ Attach the ties!  Iron really good, and iron from both sides to be sure the tape is fully melted!

attaching the ties-


 

4th step-

Making the pockets.  I like to use the sleeves for this, and I like to be creative and playful doing it!

◊ Cut open the sleeve by it’s seam and cut through the cuff.  Turn under and iron a ¼” to ½” edge on the “raw” side—the other should have the manufactured edge (right?).

◊ Once again, you’ll find multiple layers around the cuff to cut out.

creating the pockets-

◊ Play around with the sleeves to find the placement and look YOU like!

◊ Then secure it in place with the tape.  BUT don’t “glue” down that bottom inch or so—I’ll explain in a minute.

creating the pockets-

◊ Stretching the excess downward, iron the pleats and gathers flat, then cut it off with the bottom of the shirt as your guide.

creating the pockets-

◊ Tuck the gathers and pleats under and secure with the Stitch Witchery tape.  *Now you see the outer ends are easier to turn under because you didn’t secure the sides the whole way down.

closing in the bottom of the pocket

Your Shirt Apron

with NO SEWING!

a Shirt Apron with NO SEWING!

 

a Shirt Apron with NO SEWING!

Stitch Witchery

When making this project, be sure you really melt the tape into glue!

If you don’t—your project will come apart.

Here’s another NO SEW APRON      from a fun lady’s blouse!

another NO SEW APRON!

another pocket style--

Another pocket style

I sewed the two sleeves together to make one BIG pocket!

Below- some of the girls at the antique mall modeling for me!

I sure hope you’ll try this—and tell me about it!

Catherine

--the ladies at the antq mall modeling for me!

--the ladies at the antq mall modeling for me!

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Have a shirt?  Let's cut it up!So you have a shirt you’d like to RE-invent

into a HALTER APRON

—get your scissors, let’s

cut it up!

1cut the sides open, —    —& cut off the sleeves

2shape the front

3make ties

4create your pockets!

one of my old men's shirt aprons--Easy, right?  So get those scissors!

This is the sewing version, but,

DON’T LIKE TO SEW?

I’ll show you how to make it that way too—in a secondary post!

*A quick TIP as you begin—iron your shirt—it’s so much easier cutting crisp, smooth fabric and your cut lines will be better too!


1st step-

Cut  UP  the side seams to the under arms to separate the front and back of the shirt.

I like to approach this in one of 2 ways

◊ Sewing- I leave about ¼” to ½” salvage from the manufactured seam and sew some kind of trim over that extra to turn under.  The manufactured seam is still the front-side finished edge.

◊ NO Sewing- I like to cut from the “bottom” side of the manufactured seam, super close to that seam—it becomes my “finished” edge and I’m done!

after ironing the shirt smooth, the 1st cut is up the sides

Cutting off the sleeves.

 RESIST THE TEMPTATION to just lay your shirt down and cut it in this quick/random way—you’ll lose material you may need or want for other parts!   Be patient—cut up the sides, then cut off the sleeves, then shape your “halter.”

Don't cut your shirt this way!

It doesn’t really matter which side of the seam you cut from, but stay close to it so you don’t lose extra material.

cutting off the sleeves


 

2nd step-

Shape the front into a Halter.

*TIP- if you fold the front sides together your “halter” cuts will be “matching” —but it’s better to open it back up and cut freehand around the collar.  I tend to freehand all my cuts, but I drew a chalk line for you to see this better below.

◊ As you’re cutting, leave ¼” to ½” extra around the collar to either turn under or sew trim to, to be turned under.

shaping the "HALTER"

◊ Turn and iron all your cut edges under-from the side seam up and around the back of the collar.

*OR- sew trim to the cut edges that can be turned under and sewn for a crisp finish.

sewing trim over the salvaged edge to be turned under


 

3rd step-

Cut the ties from the back of the shirt -it keeps a simple continuity to the apron.

*I typically cut off the yolk just to free up the part I am using, especially when the yolk has a pleat.

Below, a couple of examples to make your tie cuts.

    1. Use a measuring guide, or
    2. as you’re cutting–fold the cut upward to create a continuing guide to keep an accurate size as you cut.
    3. Or just freehand it like I do—it’s all part of that “bespoke” look!

creating the apron ties

◊ SEW the sides, turn it and iron flat -OR- turn and iron the edges and just sew the finished top edge.  Sew the ties on.

creating the apron ties

sewing on the apron ties


 

4th step-

Making the pockets.  I like to use the sleeves for this, and I like to be creative and playful doing it!

◊ Cut open the sleeve by it’s seam and cut through the cuff.  Turn under and iron a ¼” to ½” edge on the “raw” side—the other should have the manufactured edge (right?).

◊ Play around with it to find the placement and look YOU like!

◊ Then pin it in the place you like and top stitch.

◊ I also like to leave the raw edge ironed flat, and sew IT down (good sides together) then turn it —only top stitching the manufactured side.

making the pockets

◊ Closing the bottom of the pocket—with the sleeve ironed smooth you can make orderly pleats to reduce the “size,” and cut off the excess.

◊ Fold under and iron flat, pin in place and top stitch.

the pockets--

closing the bottom of the pocket--

◊ Another example–   you can see there’s more to “gather” and fold under.

*TIP– If you don’t like pinning, you can tack it with fabric glue or 

Stitch Witchery.  

There’s a hint for the     NO-SEW version!

I’ll take you through the COMPLETELY NO SEW version in a separate post

’cause look how long this one is!  ; D

Catherine

the PINK silk apron

shirt aprons-

 

 

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a love for aprons

the history of aprons--Let me begin with this. . .

Sorry if this is initially a lot of reading.

The History of ‘APRONS’

I don’t think our kids know what an apron is. The principle use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But, along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.  And—

——-It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning dirty ears.From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.  When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.  And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

——-Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow -bent over that hot wood stove.  Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen cradled in it.  It carried all sorts of vegetables from the garden, and after the peas were shelled it carried out the hulls.  In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

——-When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.  When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

——–It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.  ~You know, some might go crazy now thinking about how many germs were on that apron— but I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron—but love. 

 I was only fast enough to get one Grandma’s apron & only one of our Great Auntie’s.  sigh  I  seeing them hung up with mine!

Anyway

While my table saw is Out of Order, I’ve been spending a lot more time at the sewing machine.

Freddy & Petunia post comment--

I happen to like to cut my shirts into a HALTER style.

the antq mall restocked with aprons!Although it REALLY IS  an easy, uncomplicated process—to break it down and show you is a bit lengthy.  So I’ll end here and put a step by step in a separate post—next. I’m just finishing photo edits to make it stream-lined and easy to follow.

And BTW—you CAN make these

without sewing!

Hope you’ll check it out— even you non-sewers!

Catherine

 

 

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one of my old men's shirt aprons--I aprons!

I love creative aprons—like aprons made from old men’s shirts!

Unfortunately, it’s getting harder and harder to find “old” men’s shirts and I’m left digging through thrift-store racks.  Oh well.

I like using the sleeves for pockets.  Like these short sleeves that create double pockets to organize what you put in them!

*Great for the flea market—organizes camera, phone, money, business cards. . .

Anyway, this is an old one sold long ago in the antique mall.  I’ve sold about a dozen there and only have two left.  So I took a fun break to sit at the sewing machine playing, and created five more to add in my space!

Old Shirt Aprons!

A few examples of using the sleeves for pockets—

aprons made from men's shirts--using sleeves for pockets!

I have a few more to make so the iron coat hook-thingy is reloaded at the antique mall!  There’s another style I’d like to play with using some grain sack scraps.

another style of apron -found at the Kane Co flea mrktTHEN—I need to get back to cleaning up my studio.

AND— I need to change all the saw blades—an expensive task because they always seem to wear out at the same time!  But can’t start the next project without fresh sharp blades—

Next project will involve cutting up an old door. . .

Catherine

I’m sharing my aprons in a few linky parties!

PhotobucketFurniture Feature Fridays

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I’m almost finished in the Hall and Alcove!

Just some details to wrap up!

Editing pictures to share with you–thought you might find this particular shot interesting.  It’s the alcove gutted for painting.  No mattress or backboard, no books, no chandelier.  Stripped down to nothin’….and still kinda cOOl!

the stripped down alcove--

The Alcove!

 

Well, everything’s been painted -some things have been fixed or altered- things are restored now and there’s something new!

But remember this view?

Or the one below?

the alcove

Here’s the addition—drapes for a little privacy!

a little privacy for the alcove--

a little privacy for the alcove--

the linen closet doors finished--

I still need to add a detailed cove at the front and back sides of the dowel-hangers ~to conceal them and give it all a more finished look.

When I couldn’t find any great old lace drapes for the linen closet doors, I pulled this from my stash of fabricsI’d forgotten about it actually.

After using it to finish the doors, I had plenty left to play with!  ; D

~and there’s still more!

Catherine

the changing ALCOVE

 

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the kids' rockers---beforeMy bf bought these rockers for her twins.

Now that they’re too big for them, she passed them on to my nephew’s two little girls.

However— they’re gonna  need a makeover.  Enter~ Great Auntie! (sucker!)

To make this big job more affordable I struck a deal with my favorite upholstery-girl Katie, and I spent  the day ---the knock down(literally) knocking down/stripping off the old fabric.  It took almost 4 hours per chair with lots of pain -BLooD- and the enduring memory of the worst knock-down I have EVer done.

I believe I can accurately saythe original upholsterer must have been PAID by the STAPLE—.

A few days ago I took one of the rockers to the fabric store with me to get some assist figuring out how much fabric each chair would require.  And wasn’t sure what I was looking for FOR the fabric yet!  So having the chair there was gREAT!

I found 3 really fab selections, but nothing stood out as the clear choice.  I was encouraged to bring the chair into the store to drape the choices over it—maybe it will help they all said!  So I did.

the 3rd choice of fabric---

At this point I had 2 store employees and 3 other shoppers fully interested in how this would play out!

I laid the 1st and 2nd choices over the chair—everyone agreed they looked….N I C E….

But then I laid out the 3rd choice and the whole area erupted with ooohs and aaaahs!   ~Clearly the winner!!!

Here’s a “taste” of the progress, they’ll be finished tomorrow and delivered to one birthday girl and her little sister!  Can’t wait to show you, but I think you’ll be surprised….

there are two twists to the finish!  ; D

Catherine

the kids rockers!

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my Pier 1 wicker chairs-- these old high-backed chairs—sO comfy!

–well, maybe they’re not  -OLD-  I bought them at Pier 1 in ’99.

They went from my bedroom patio, directly to storage after my house sold, and they sure don’t look so good–WoW!

So I’m repairing, repainting, and making cushions for them.

*Don’t know if you’re aware that       –Vinyl spray paintis better for wicker.  IT FLEXES, so to speak.

*The forward chair is already worked over!

You can see I’ve already begun to make repairs to the second.  I decided to use construction adhesive to just re-secure the weavings.

-yrepairing my old  wicker chairs

One down, one to go! 

Catherine

One down, one to go!

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