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Archive for the ‘sewing projects’ Category

Marie's chair-My niece-i-l found this cool old chair thrifting!

My nephew hates it.

He has no vision.

And apparently neither did the chair.  

Have you ever worked on a project that fought you at every turn?

Me and this chair—we did not get along.  It seriously resisted change.

Marie sanded & REstained it, and came with it and some new fabric to get REupholstered Saturday night.

It all started with the chair being seriously ornery about just boosting it up on saw horses to work.  Then the staples kept shooting through the fabric.  Every angle was impossible to get into/at.  The velvet in the fabric kept throwing off the timing on my sewing machine while I was running welting.  AND I burnt my fingers a ‘cazillion times wrestling with and gluing the welting in place~arrrgh.

A simple enough job that should have taken an hour (maybe two)

finally finished Sunday afternoon.

Marie's chair-I’ve never been so happy to say

it’s finished!

Now leave me and go back home. . .

Catherine

Marie's chair-

Marie's chair-

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Thought you might like to see some of those holiday stockings

I’ve been sewing.  Yes, they’re all on the feminine side.
Probably more for decorating with than truly stuffing!
And, at the end of the day~ I liked the plainness of them and wrinkled linen.
Like this, I think they’ll be more flexible to embellish with/in other holiday decorating.  Like- stuffing them with a bit of evergreen, sage, or holly.  Or by hanging a personalized initial from the backside hanging loop.
Holiday Stockings
And these are two other styles and textures I was playing with. . .

...a couple other styles and textures-

...a couple other styles and textures-

 

Besides sewing, I’ve been hard at it on the fall clean upoh my aching muscles!

Raking leaves -endlessly- rounding up and covering furniture, cleaning out gardens, cutting down a LOT of plants prepping for the snow to fly.  Unfortunately SOONER than later—they’re predicting a big snow storm this weekend.  Boooooo

fall clean up-

fall clean up-

fall clean up-.

.

. . . and prepping for

holiday decorating. . .

I decided on this iron urn for this season’s front steps arrangement.

*only bumped finger like 21 times getting work done.

Catherine

 

 

 

 

 

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-on the road to recovery!woo·hoo~I’m just about to stage a comeback!  But until~

It has been a  L·O·N·G  6 weeks     since my hand surgery.

It sure feels ·SO· much longer, but I’m happy to have at least that much time -and healing- behind me as I adapt to all kinds of new “normals.”

Like how everything touching my finger either feels like super coarse sand paper or razor blades trying to hurt me further, or how incredibly painful it is because of the swelling AND trying to bend it again AND because my clutzy-self keeps bumping it into everything imaginable!

It’s also shorter nowhmm…because of the screw?

I am SO happy to finally jump back into at least a “soft” project—like sewing!

found on pintrest!I’ve begun working on some Christmas stockings for an upcoming Holiday show.  Looking around pintrest for some inspiration, I keep coming back to this beauty!  (*can’t seem to find the original creator though)

I have all kinds of textural scrap leftovers from other projects ~grain sacks, linen~ I only needed to buy some pleated trim (too lazy to make my own).

I may –or may not– add some graphic transfers or extra embellishments since they look pretty –plain– too!  We’ll see!

Here are my first four

I made a template from some larger-sized blank stencil sheets.  It’s a firm pattern to use for consistent sizes AND you can see fabric prints through it.  (I accidentally bought white sheets this time~ooops!)

sewing the cutout sides together-

sewing the liner and outsides together and adding the trim-

-stockings for a Holiday show!Christmas stockings are actually very easy sewing projects…

to all you non-sewers!

I still need to add the loops they will hang by, and make the decision~

to embellish or

not to embellish!

That is the question!

I’ve been playing with grain sacks and linen, and pleated cotton & grosgrain trim,

as well as vintage laces from my collections/stashes.

Catherine

*btw— I had a really good 6wk post-op check up, so I’m hoping to be back to my furniture and wood projects really soon!
-the first Holiday Show Christmas Stockings!

-stockings with some vintage handkerchief lace!

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The chairs at the breakfast table are really wearing out.  They were thrift store finds to begin that needed work—in 1999.

One was only $4, the other was a gift.

The breakfast area has a very ethereal feel to it. . .with all miss-matched pieces brought together by fabric and paint.

mom's breakfast area-

I’ve been watching for a couple of interesting replacement chairs    for a while now—and hoping for a matching pair this time around.

But LOOK WHAT I FOUND -but there was only ONE left—there were TWO, someone bought just one of them, dang it!  I presume because of the broken cane in the seat.  I negotiated $20.  I  LUV the super tall back!

Caned Chair from Diego's store $20

Well, first thing to do was -make sure it looked good at the table and with the banquett!   -Whew!

working on the new caned chair-

I painted the chair white.

I really couldn’t see the benefit in ripping out the cane, so I applied webbing right over the top -and decided to hot glue the cane and webbing together for extra strength.  Now you can sit in confidence!

Next, I grabbed some card stock paper to create a seat pattern.

Then I transferred the seat pattern to the grain sack I wanted to use.

* THE GRAIN SACK has a very special connection!  The farm my mother grew up on was eventually sold to distant cousins, who gave me one of their farm grain sacks on one of our yearly trips down to there—SO nice!

working on the new caned chair-

working on the new caned chair-

Thick Grain Sack can be very exhausting to cut, so I like to use the old electric scissors!

(Do they even sell these anymore?)

I cut banding strips too to sew a boxed seat cover.

~and I was off to the sewing machine…


Next I used batting and left over foam to give the seat a little extra cush’…

and finally I could apply the boxed cover…

working on the new caned chair-

working on the new caned chair-

The seat is a little shallow, but it’s wide and very comfortable!

working on the new caned chair-

I love the grain sack -and the personal connection to it- and I love the bespoke look and feel!  The other side of it, or, back side of it is in reserve for whatever 2nd chair I find.  As for the banquette—I’m hunting for some upholstery-grade linen (or if I’m lucky enough to find some HEMP), and I’ll REcover that as well!

The ceiling is in for a design change too- including chandelier, and a change to the back wall~but that’s a little down the pike!  Stay tuned. . .

Catherine

the new caned chair!

making some changes-

making changes-

I’m sharing this project with–

French Country Cottage

The Curator’s Collection

Savvy Southern Style

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the PINK silk apronSo you DON’T like to SEW!

Stitch WitcheryYou can still make this apron without a stitch—well, you will need     Stitch Witchery.

  Just 4 easy steps!

1— cut the sides open,

     & cut off the sleeves

2— shape the front

3— make ties

4— create your pockets!

*A quick TIP as you begin—iron your shirt—it’s so much easier cutting crisp, smooth fabric and your cut lines will be better too!


 

1st step-

Cut  UP  the side seams to the under arms to separate the front and back of the shirt.

I like to approach this in one of 2 ways

◊ I cut SUPER CLOSE to the manufactured seam.  Cutting from the “bottom” side of that manufactured seam—it becomes the “finished” edge and I’m done!

◊ Leave ¼” to ½” salvage from the manufactured seam to turn under.  The manufactured seam will still be the front-side finished edge.

shirt aprons -NO SEWING

Cutting off the sleeves.

 RESIST THE TEMPTATION to just lay your shirt down and cut it in this quick/random way—you’ll lose material you may need or want for other parts!   Be patient—cut up the sides, cut off the sleeves, then shape your “halter.”

shaping the front and cutting off the arms

◊ It doesn’t really matter which side of the seam you cut, but do stay close to it so you don’t lose extra material.

cutting off the sleeves-


 

2nd step-

Shape the front into a Halter.

*TIP- if you fold the front sides together your “halter” cuts will be “matching” —but it’s better to open it back up and cut freehand around the collar.  I tend to freehand all my cuts, but I drew a chalk line for you to see this better below.

◊ As you’re cutting, leave ¼” to ½” extra around the collar to turn under.

shaping the "HALTER"

Now that you have the main cuts made, you can start to turn under the raw edges to “hem.”

◊ Start from the lower sides, folding over-turning and ironing, working upward to the collar.

prepping to "hem" the raw edges

raw edges folded over and ironed

◊ Using the Stitch Witchery tape, you’ll essentially tuck the tape between (wrong side of fabric) the inside of the apron and the turned/ironed edge AND THEN IRON OVER IT TO MELT THE TAPE fusing the fabric with NO sewing!

Stitch Witchery tape is –glue– when it’s melted by the heat of an iron.  The product instructions say to use a dry iron, but having used this product in lots of ways over many years time, I’ve found—the tape melts easier and better with a steam iron!

*I keep a small roll in my luggage when I travel for any quick fixes!

*I’m told fabric glue would work well too—although I’ve never tried it.

◊ As you work your way around to the collar, you’ll see it has multiple layers and you’ll need to cut some away.  Then continue to iron the area together with the Stitch Witchery tape.

cut away any extra layers

fusing the "seams" together -

the apron--without sewing


 

3rd step-

Cutting the ties from the back of the shirt -it keeps a simple continuity to the apron.

◊ I typically cut off the yolk just to free up the part I am using, especially  when there’s a pleat at the yolk.

◊ Fold the back of the shirt in half.

cutting the ties-

Below, a couple examples for making your tie cuts.

    1. Use a measuring guide, or
    2. as you’re cutting–fold that cut upward creating a continuing accurate size guide as you cut.
    3. Or just freehand it like I do—it’s all part of that “bespoke” look!

◊ A 2″ wide tie works well for me, so I cut a 4″ wide piece from the folded over area.

◊ When you unfold the piece you have 2 sides—cut it in 2.

cutting the ties-

◊ Fold over and iron ¼” edge on each side, then fold the whole piece in half.  Put the Stitch Witchery between the two sides and iron till the tape is melted.

creating the ties-

creating the ties-

◊ Attach the ties!  Iron really good, and iron from both sides to be sure the tape is fully melted!

attaching the ties-


 

4th step-

Making the pockets.  I like to use the sleeves for this, and I like to be creative and playful doing it!

◊ Cut open the sleeve by it’s seam and cut through the cuff.  Turn under and iron a ¼” to ½” edge on the “raw” side—the other should have the manufactured edge (right?).

◊ Once again, you’ll find multiple layers around the cuff to cut out.

creating the pockets-

◊ Play around with the sleeves to find the placement and look YOU like!

◊ Then secure it in place with the tape.  BUT don’t “glue” down that bottom inch or so—I’ll explain in a minute.

creating the pockets-

◊ Stretching the excess downward, iron the pleats and gathers flat, then cut it off with the bottom of the shirt as your guide.

creating the pockets-

◊ Tuck the gathers and pleats under and secure with the Stitch Witchery tape.  *Now you see the outer ends are easier to turn under because you didn’t secure the sides the whole way down.

closing in the bottom of the pocket

Your Shirt Apron

with NO SEWING!

a Shirt Apron with NO SEWING!

 

a Shirt Apron with NO SEWING!

Stitch Witchery

When making this project, be sure you really melt the tape into glue!

If you don’t—your project will come apart.

Here’s another NO SEW APRON      from a fun lady’s blouse!

another NO SEW APRON!

another pocket style--

Another pocket style

I sewed the two sleeves together to make one BIG pocket!

Below- some of the girls at the antique mall modeling for me!

I sure hope you’ll try this—and tell me about it!

Catherine

--the ladies at the antq mall modeling for me!

--the ladies at the antq mall modeling for me!

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Have a shirt?  Let's cut it up!So you have a shirt you’d like to RE-invent

into a HALTER APRON

—get your scissors, let’s

cut it up!

1cut the sides open, —    —& cut off the sleeves

2shape the front

3make ties

4create your pockets!

one of my old men's shirt aprons--Easy, right?  So get those scissors!

This is the sewing version, but,

DON’T LIKE TO SEW?

I’ll show you how to make it that way too—in a secondary post!

*A quick TIP as you begin—iron your shirt—it’s so much easier cutting crisp, smooth fabric and your cut lines will be better too!


1st step-

Cut  UP  the side seams to the under arms to separate the front and back of the shirt.

I like to approach this in one of 2 ways

◊ Sewing- I leave about ¼” to ½” salvage from the manufactured seam and sew some kind of trim over that extra to turn under.  The manufactured seam is still the front-side finished edge.

◊ NO Sewing- I like to cut from the “bottom” side of the manufactured seam, super close to that seam—it becomes my “finished” edge and I’m done!

after ironing the shirt smooth, the 1st cut is up the sides

Cutting off the sleeves.

 RESIST THE TEMPTATION to just lay your shirt down and cut it in this quick/random way—you’ll lose material you may need or want for other parts!   Be patient—cut up the sides, then cut off the sleeves, then shape your “halter.”

Don't cut your shirt this way!

It doesn’t really matter which side of the seam you cut from, but stay close to it so you don’t lose extra material.

cutting off the sleeves


 

2nd step-

Shape the front into a Halter.

*TIP- if you fold the front sides together your “halter” cuts will be “matching” —but it’s better to open it back up and cut freehand around the collar.  I tend to freehand all my cuts, but I drew a chalk line for you to see this better below.

◊ As you’re cutting, leave ¼” to ½” extra around the collar to either turn under or sew trim to, to be turned under.

shaping the "HALTER"

◊ Turn and iron all your cut edges under-from the side seam up and around the back of the collar.

*OR- sew trim to the cut edges that can be turned under and sewn for a crisp finish.

sewing trim over the salvaged edge to be turned under


 

3rd step-

Cut the ties from the back of the shirt -it keeps a simple continuity to the apron.

*I typically cut off the yolk just to free up the part I am using, especially when the yolk has a pleat.

Below, a couple of examples to make your tie cuts.

    1. Use a measuring guide, or
    2. as you’re cutting–fold the cut upward to create a continuing guide to keep an accurate size as you cut.
    3. Or just freehand it like I do—it’s all part of that “bespoke” look!

creating the apron ties

◊ SEW the sides, turn it and iron flat -OR- turn and iron the edges and just sew the finished top edge.  Sew the ties on.

creating the apron ties

sewing on the apron ties


 

4th step-

Making the pockets.  I like to use the sleeves for this, and I like to be creative and playful doing it!

◊ Cut open the sleeve by it’s seam and cut through the cuff.  Turn under and iron a ¼” to ½” edge on the “raw” side—the other should have the manufactured edge (right?).

◊ Play around with it to find the placement and look YOU like!

◊ Then pin it in the place you like and top stitch.

◊ I also like to leave the raw edge ironed flat, and sew IT down (good sides together) then turn it —only top stitching the manufactured side.

making the pockets

◊ Closing the bottom of the pocket—with the sleeve ironed smooth you can make orderly pleats to reduce the “size,” and cut off the excess.

◊ Fold under and iron flat, pin in place and top stitch.

the pockets--

closing the bottom of the pocket--

◊ Another example–   you can see there’s more to “gather” and fold under.

*TIP– If you don’t like pinning, you can tack it with fabric glue or 

Stitch Witchery.  

There’s a hint for the     NO-SEW version!

I’ll take you through the COMPLETELY NO SEW version in a separate post

’cause look how long this one is!  ; D

Catherine

the PINK silk apron

shirt aprons-

 

 

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a love for aprons

the history of aprons--Let me begin with this. . .

Sorry if this is initially a lot of reading.

The History of ‘APRONS’

I don’t think our kids know what an apron is. The principle use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But, along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.  And—

——-It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning dirty ears.From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.  When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.  And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

——-Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow -bent over that hot wood stove.  Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen cradled in it.  It carried all sorts of vegetables from the garden, and after the peas were shelled it carried out the hulls.  In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

——-When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.  When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

——–It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.  ~You know, some might go crazy now thinking about how many germs were on that apron— but I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron—but love. 

 I was only fast enough to get one Grandma’s apron & only one of our Great Auntie’s.  sigh  I  seeing them hung up with mine!

Anyway

While my table saw is Out of Order, I’ve been spending a lot more time at the sewing machine.

Freddy & Petunia post comment--

I happen to like to cut my shirts into a HALTER style.

the antq mall restocked with aprons!Although it REALLY IS  an easy, uncomplicated process—to break it down and show you is a bit lengthy.  So I’ll end here and put a step by step in a separate post—next. I’m just finishing photo edits to make it stream-lined and easy to follow.

And BTW—you CAN make these

without sewing!

Hope you’ll check it out— even you non-sewers!

Catherine

 

 

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